• Formatting transition announcement

    January 1, 2019: The Journal of Sport for Development is announcing a formatting transition from Vancouver Referencing to APA (American Psychological Association) Citation format (6th edition).
  • Volume 6, Issue 11 published

    Read the latest JSFD issue, including five articles from around the world.

Recent Articles

Call for Special Issue Proposals on Sport and Livelihoods

The Journal of Sport for Development (JSFD) is seeking proposals for a special issue on sport and livelihoods. Sport for development organizations are increasingly delivering programming to improve the livelihoods of disadvantaged populations by increasing employment opportunities or economic development.

Volume 6, Issue 11 published

The Journal of Sport for Development (JSFD) is pleased to announce the publication of its eleventh issue. JSFD’s mission is to examine, advance and disseminate evidence, best practices, and lessons learned from Sport for Development programmes and interventions. JSFD is the first peer-reviewed, open-access journal devoted to exclusively publishing research from the field of Sport for Development.

Volume 6, Issue 10 published

The Journal of Sport for Development (JSFD) is pleased to announce the publication of its tenth issue, a Special Issue on Sport for Development and Peace in Latin America and the Caribbean. Guest editors include: Daniel Parnell, Alexander Cárdenas, Paul Widdop, Pedro-Pablo Cardoso-Castro and Sibylle Lang.

Esporte para o Desenvolvimento e a Paz na América Latina e no Caribe (Editorial)

Esta edição da Revista de Esporte para o Desenvolvimento tem como objetivo apresentar a crescente literatura sobre “Esporte para o Desenvolvimento e a Paz” (EDP) na América Latina e no Caribe. Ela foi concebida durante pesquisas de campo em Medellín (Colômbia) nos anos de 2014 e 2015 pelos editores desta edição especial. Essas pesquisas envolveram trabalhos com departamentos governamentais, acadêmicos e grupos comunitários com o intuito de examinar o papel do esporte e do futebol e seus diferentes impactos sociais. Nosso período em Medellín nos permitiu ver o EDP como um esforço comunitário coletivo e uma genuína abordagem colaborativa do governo e das universidades locais.

Deporte para el Desarrollo y la Paz en América Latina y el Caribe (Editorial)

Esta edición especial tiene como objetivo ofrecer un punto de enfoque para la creciente literatura sobre el “Deporte para el Desarrollo y la Paz” (DDP) en América Latina y el Caribe. Fue concebida durante visitas de campo a Medellín (Colombia) por los editores de esta edición especial en 2014 y 2015. Estas visitas implicaron trabajar con departamentos gubernamentales, académicos y grupos comunitarios para examinar el papel del deporte y del fútbol dentro de una amplia gama de objetivos sociales. Nuestra visita a Medellín nos permitió ver el DDP como un esfuerzo colectivo comunitario y como un enfoque de colaboración genuino por parte del gobierno local y las universidades.

Sport for Development and Peace in Latin America and the Caribbean (Editorial)

This Special Issue aims to offer a focus point for the growing literature on ‘Sport for Development and Peace’ (SDP) in Latin America and the Caribbean. It was conceived during field visits to Medellín (Colombia) in 2014 and 2015 by the editors of this Special Issue. These visits involved working with government departments, academics and community groups to examine the role of sport and football for a broad range of social outcomes. Our time in Medellin allowed us to view SDP as a collective community endeavour, and a genuine collaborative approach by local Government and Universities.

The impact of the Hoodlinks Programme on developing life skills and preventing youth violence in Guatemala City

Hoodlinks is a sporting programme focused on the development of Olympic values that is run in two of Guatemala City’s most violent zones. A total of 116 (80 males; 36 females) athletes (average age = 13 yrs.) participated in this study along with five coaches. Using a mixed-methods longitudinal design, athletes completed a series of questionnaires six months apart that assessed their level of aggressive and caring behaviours, use of life skills both in and outside the Hoodlinks programme, and their overall quality of experience within the programme. Interviews with athletes, their parents/guardians, and the programme’s coaches also took place at both time periods. Results showed high positive experiences in the Hoodlinks programme at both time periods, significant increases in the use of life skills within the Hoodlinks programme as assessed by their coaches, and significant increases in overall communication skills. Interviews with the participants highlighted the importance of running the programme directly in high risk areas and the positive impact that the programme had on the development of life skills for the athletes, the positive changes within the communities where Hoodlinks took place, and the additional levels of support that the Hoodlinks programme had provided to athletes and their families. Recommendations for helping athletes transfer the life skills learned within the programme to their everyday lives are provided.

JSFD in times of change: A reflection on milestones met and challenges ahead

In March 2013, the Journal of Sport for Development (JSFD) published its first issue as an online, open-access academic journal explicitly dedicated to sport for development (SFD) research. JSFD’s mission was to embark on a journey towards advancing, examining and disseminating best practices and evidence of effectiveness from programs and interventions that use sport to promote (international) development in the seven thematic areas of: education, disability, gender, health, livelihoods, social cohesion, and peace.1 Five years from its inauguration, it seems timely to look back and reflect on some of JSFD’s organizational developments, key achievements, and future challenges.

U.S. sport diplomacy in Latin America and the Caribbean: A programme evaluation

The focus of this study is a specific SDP programme, entitled Sports Visitors, executed in partnership between George Mason University and the U.S. Department of State. The purpose of this programme evaluation was to examine a subset of Latin American and Caribbean groups to ascertain the immediate, short-term impact of an intervention programme on the attitudes of participants relative to programme objectives. Nine groups comprised of 150 sport visitors participated in this investigation over a five year period. After the data were cleaned, 143 valid responses remained for analysis. The findings are based upon descriptive and effect size outcomes of quantitative survey data supplemented by qualitative comments provided by participants. The overall total mean for all seven items combined yields a very large effect size of 1.43. The results indicate that a) positive change occurred among LAC participants across all objectives measured, and b) changes were consistently reflected across each type of LAC participant group based upon gender, role, and gender with role.

‘Sport for development’ in Japan

Although the field of Sport for Development (SfD) has been progressing in the international community for some time, the Japanese government only recently began looking for ways to contribute to the field during Tokyo’s bid to host the 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games. Promoting Tokyo’s bid, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe introduced the ‘Sport for Tomorrow (SFT)’ programme to bring the joy of sports to at least 10 million children in 100 countries by 2020. However, the progress made as of 2016 indicates that reaching this target would be difficult at the current pace. Japan’s sluggish economic growth is creating various problems for the sports world in Japan, and the significance of aiding developing countries through sport has not been properly explained. Most Japanese people are unfamiliar with both SfD and SFT, although the scope and amount of SFT activities are expected to increase as the Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Games approach.